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Microsoft word - testing drug resides summary - final

FSIS to change testing approach for residues in meat
During the first week of August, the USDA Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) began a new program for testing meat (along with poultry and eggs) for chemical
residues. This change reflects new methods for detecting residues and new testing
strategies. This is part of an overall tougher stance on meat residues coming from the
FDA. Shipping cows that test positive for residues may result in public announcement of
the violation and loss of the ability to ship cows to slaughter in addition to the loss of
value from the carcass that produced the positive test. Similar approaches may also be
used to evaluate milk for chemical residues in the future.
What are the changes that were enacted?
Samples are now collected in three ways. First, there are scheduled samples, which are random samples collected across each class (including bob veal calves, dairy cows, and heifers along with other categories of beef cattle). The number of these samples collected will increase nearly three-fold. Second, inspectors can now sample cattle that are considered to be “at-risk” for containing a drug residue. Third, testing on the herd level may be conducted. This will be a targeting sampling looking for residues of drug that are typically given at the herd-level (for example, antibiotics given within feeds). This testing will evaluate cattle originating from the same farm or region. The methods used to test were also changed. These changes include a multi- residue analytic screening method that allows for the evaluation of many more drugs or
other chemicals along with a faster turnaround time. This approach will allow testing for
drugs beyond those that inhibit microbial growth that were the focus of the previous
testing method.
What are the common violations?
From July, 2009 to June, 2010, dairy cows and veal calves contributed the greatest number of violations. Commonly found residues included Penicillin,
Sulfadimethoxine, Flunixin, and Neomycin. These four drugs were responsible for 69%
of the 404l residue violations during that time.
Common causes for residue violations?

Several studies on drug residues suggest the following are typically the cause of 1. Incorrect treatment due to failure to follow the label directions 2. Insufficient (less than label directions) withdraw period 3. Failure to correctly record treatment (resulting in insufficient withdraw period or 4. Calf treatments, including medicated milk replacers, resulting in long-term
What chemical can be tested for – generic name (brand name)?
Ampicillin-Polyflex or other generics
How can risk for drug residues be minimized on farm?

With the introduction of the new testing approach, now is an excellent time to review each drug contained in your medicine cabinet and review the following questions for each: 1. What is this drug? 2. Who on the farm can receive this drug? For example, can a lactating dairy cow be treated with 3. Is this drug administered intravenously or intramuscularly? 4. What is the correct dose to administer? 5. How long does the milk or meat need to be withheld following the administration of this drug? 6. Is this drug currently being, or ever, used in an “off-label” fashion? If so, are/were the proper procedures followed with your veterinarian? 7. Is there a protocol in place for recording and ‘tagging’ animals that have received a drug and prevent their leaving the farm until the withdraw time has been met?
References:
Moore, D. A. 2012. New meat residue testing program.
http://www.animalag.wsu.edu/Whats%20New/FSISDrugTestingt2012NewMeatResidueTestingProgram
2012.pdf. Accessed on August 20, 2012.
Moore, D. A. 2010. Residues? I thought we took care of that! Or have we?
http://extension.wsu.edu/vetextension/Documents/Spotlights/Residues_Oct2010.pdf.
Accessed on August 20, 2012.
Questions?
Contact:
Dr. Peter Krawczel, Dairy Research and Extension Specialist, Department of
Animal Science 2460 Morgan Circle Drive 201-E McCord Hall Knoxville, TN 37796 865-974-8941 pkrawcze@utk.edu Programs in agriculture and natural resources, 4-H youth development, family and consumer sciences, and resource development. University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture and county governments cooperating. UT Extension provides equal opportunities in programs and employment. · http://animalscience.ag.utk.edu/ ·
Programs in agriculture and natural resources, 4-H youth development, family and consumer sciences, and resource development. University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture and county governments cooperating. UT Extension provides equal opportunities in programs and employment. · http://animalscience.ag.utk.edu/ ·

Source: http://economics.ag.utk.edu/market/milk/TestingDrugResidesSummaryFinal.pdf

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